Holy Orders

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Holy Orders

 

Introduction

The Sacrament of Holy Orders is the continuation of Christ's priesthood, which He bestowed upon His Apostles; thus, the Catechism of the Catholic Church refers to the Sacrament of Holy Orders as "the sacrament of apostolic ministry."

"Ordination" comes from the Latin word ordinatio, which means to incorporate someone into an order. In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, a man is incorporated into the priesthood of Christ, at one of three levels: the episcopate, the priesthood, or the diaconate.

The Priesthood of Christ:

The priesthood was established by God among the Israelites during their exodus from Egypt. God chose the tribe of Levi as priests for the nation. Their primary duties were the offering of sacrifice and prayer for the people. Christ, in offering Himself up for the sins of all mankind, fulfilled the duties of the Old Testament priesthood once and for all. But just as the Eucharist makes that sacrifice present to us today, so the New Testament priesthood is a sharing in the eternal priesthood of Christ. While all believers are, in some sense, priests, some are set aside to serve the Church as Christ Himself did.

The Ordination of Bishops:

There is only one Sacrament of Holy Orders, but there are three levels. The first is that which Christ Himself bestowed upon His Apostles: the episcopate. A bishop is a man who is ordained to the episcopate by another bishop (in practice, by several bishops). He stands in a direct, unbroken line from the Apostles, a condition known as "apostolic succession."Ordination as a bishop confers the grace to sanctify others, as well as the authority to teach the faithful and to bind their consciences. Because of the grave nature of this responsibility, all episcopal ordinations must be approved by the Pope.

The Ordination of Priests:

The second level of the Sacrament of Holy Orders is the priesthood. No bishop can minister to all of the faithful in his diocese, so priests act, in the words of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, as "co-workers of the bishops." They exercise their powers lawfully only in communion with their bishop, and so they promise obedience to their bishop at the time of their ordination.

The chief duties of the priesthood are the preaching of the Gospel and the offering of the Eucharist.

Sacred Heart Parish Priest Fr. Shaun Smith.

Fr Shaun was born in Barnsley and brought up in Sheffield.  He went to Ushaw College Durham for his seminary training and was ordained by Bishop Gerald Moverley in 1968.  His earlier priesthood was spent in Huddesrfield, Leeds, Maltby, Woodlands, and Wickersley.  In 1996 he came to Sacred Heart Hillsbsorough. Two years later Bishop John Rawsthorne gave him the additional responsibility of chairing the Hallam Diocesan Justice and Peace Commission.  This has involved him with Church Action on Poverty, One Sheffield Many Cultures, the Sheffield Faith Leaders Group, work with asylum seekers, CAFOD, and matters relating to peace, social justice, and the impact of climate change.

The role of Deacons:

The duty of the Deacon is to administer baptism solemnly, to be custodian and dispenser of the Eucharist, to assist at and bless marriages in the name of the Church, to bring Viaticum to the dying, to read the Sacred Scripture to the faithful, to administer sacramentals, to officiate at funerals and burial services."

The General Instruction on the Roman Missal says at Mass the Deacon should exercise his ministry, wearing sacred vestments, and assist the Priest and remain at his side, minister at the Altar, with the Chalice as well as the books, proclaim the Gospel, from time to time at the direction of the Priest Celebrant to preach the homily, guide the faithful by appropriate instructions and explanations, announce the intentions of the prayers of the faithful, invite the sign of peace to be shared, assist the Priest in the distributing of Communion, purify and arrange the Sacred Vessels, dismiss the people at the end of Mass and fulfil the duties of other ministers if they are not present. The permanent Diaconate is open to married and single men. A Deacon exercises his ministry on a voluntary and part time basis. This means he continues to hold regular full time employment in his secular job while offering his service as Deacon outside of his work and family commitments. A Deacon is not paid.

 

 

Sacred Heart Deacon Tony Strike

Deacon Tony was ordained by Bishop Crispian Hollis, Bishop of Portsmouth, in 2004 and prior to being appointed by Bishop John Rawsthorne, Bishop of Hallam, to the parish of Sacred Heart,Hillsborough, he served as Deacon at Saint Margaret Mary, Park Gate, Fareham, for nine years.Tony is married to Caroline and together they have three children. He works at the University of Sheffield as Director of Strategy and Planning. At Sacred Heart, Hillsborough, Deacon Tony undertakes a variety of specific roles supporting Father Shaun and serving our community. As well as assisting at Mass (e.g. proclaiming the Gospel, preparing the Altar) he teaches and preaches, leads parish and Deanery retreats, assists with the preparation of candidates for Confirmation and prepares couples for the Sacrament of Marriage.

Eligibility for the Sacrament:

The Sacrament of Holy Orders can be validly conferred only on baptized men, following the example set by Christ and His Apostles, who chose only men as their successors and collaborators. A man cannot demand ordination; the Church has the authority to determine eligibility for the sacrament.

While the episcopate is reserved to unmarried men, the discipline regarding the priesthood varies in East and West. The Eastern Churches allow married men to be ordained priests, while the Western Church insists on celibacy. Once a man has received the Sacrament of Holy Orders, however, he cannot marry.

The Form of the Sacrament:

As the Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:The essential rite of the sacrament of Holy Orders for all three degrees consists in the bishop's imposition of hands on the head of the ordinand and in the bishop's specific consecratory prayer asking God for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and his gifts proper to the ministry to which the candidate is being ordained.

The Minister of the Sacrament:

Because of his role as a successor to the Apostles, who were themselves successors to Christ, the bishop is the proper minister of the sacrament. The grace of sanctifying others that he receives at his own ordination allows him to ordain others.

The Effects of the Sacrament:

The Sacrament of Holy Orders, like the Sacrament of Baptism and the Sacrament of Confirmation can only be received once for each level of ordination. Once a man has been ordained, he is spiritually changed, which is the origin of the saying, "Once a priest, always a priest." He can be dispensed of his obligations as a priest (or even forbidden to act as a priest); but he remains a priest forever.

Each level of ordination confers special graces, from the ability to preach, granted to deacons; to the ability to act in the person of Christ to offer the Mass, granted to priests; to a special grace of strength, granted to bishops, which allows him to teach and lead his flock, even to the point of dying as Christ did.